Tag Archives: Ipsos MediaCT

Converting the digital transistor resistor

Dude listening to the radio in fake relaxed poseThe Government has previously announced that, by the end of this year, it will “make a decision on whether a radio (digital) switchover is in the best interests of broadcasters, manufacturers and consumers” – or listeners, if you prefer.

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Have we taken leave of our census?

Have we taken leave of our census?Our 200-year-old census is under threat. Time has been called on the decennial bastion of market research. The ONS have announced that they will shortly be launching a consultation to discuss two possible options: either an online-only census every ten years or a re-packaging of administrative data regularly collected every year by the Government combined with a rolling annual survey.

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Australian media are down (under) but not out

Harbour bridge sydneyIn their recent global entertainment and media outlook report, PwC paints a fairly rosy picture for television, radio and cinema, but the canvas looks bleak for newspapers and magazines.  It forecasts that advertising income for radio will rise by 9% by 2017, which would put it almost neck and neck with print newspapers. Read more on Australian media are down (under) but not out…

Tablets are plane sailing for publishers

On a recent aeroplane flight, I looked around the cabin and all I saw were people absorbed in their smartphones and tablets of all shapes and sizes.  There was even the awfully named cross breed device called the phablet.  Well, it is either a phone or it isn’t and, anyway, I think it would be much more fun to call it a tablerone.  The latest National Readership Survey (NRS) estimates that 53% of British adults now use a smartphone and 31% use a tablet, with the latter enjoying an incredible 246% increase in just 12 months. Read more on Tablets are plane sailing for publishers…

It’s only words and words are all I have

Last Sunday, I was enjoying a rare moment of relaxation reading the newspaper whilst listening to the radio.  There is something about both the written and spoken word which is quite special and should be savoured.  It was therefore unnerving to read Jeremy Clarkson’s piece (‘Pah to apostrophes!’) that day on why we should not get all worked up about grammar and that we should get rid of the alphabet altogether. Read more on It’s only words and words are all I have…

The return of the New Model Army

The sexy job this decade is supposed to be a statistician.  This brings a smile to my face as I recall sitting in my statistics lectures at University twenty years ago surrounded by greasy, spotty men (91.7%) and very few women (8.3%).  Statistics in those days was anything but sexy. Read more on The return of the New Model Army…

I predict a big data riot

Who owns the data we personally generate every day, the digital traces we leave behind each second?  This “big data” thing is growing so rapidly and companies know so much about us as individuals, that they are probably predicting exactly what we will do in the next hour. Read more on I predict a big data riot…

Latest readership figures are easy on the i

The latest set of National Readership Survey (NRS) results published today (15 February) continues to show the national decline in reading printed newspapers.  However, there is an exception this time round.  The i newspaper recorded a year-on-year increase of 149,000 readers (+32%).  Launched in October 2010, it now has 122,000 more readers on an average day than the Independent (plus a much higher circulation). Read more on Latest readership figures are easy on the i…

From Lincoln to Abbey Road – an outdoor media trip

Abbey Road TfL NoticeLast night, Daniel Day-Lewis deservedly won the Best Actor BAFTA for his portrayal of President Lincoln.  Indeed, 150 years ago this year, Lincoln gave his famous Gettysburg (“four score and seven years ago”) address during the American Civil War.  Closer to home, 1863 was also quite a year as two iconic English brands were born.  The Football Association laid out a set of rules, which were first followed in a match between Barnes and Richmond (0-0 draw) and the very first journey on the London Underground took place between Paddington and Farringdon.

For what is a truly remarkable feat of Victorian engineering, we moan about the Tube a lot.  We moan when they are late, on strike or when someone jumps in front of one.  We moan when people force their way on before you have a chance to get off.  We moan when people don’t move down the carriage to let people on or when the closing doors are squeezed open.  But we smile when we read one of those Poems on the Underground or when the driver has a sense of humour.  We feel good when the elderly or pregnant are offered a seat or an 80s pop star breaks into song.  We also marvel at the Harry Beck designed map that is so pleasing on the eye (personally, I’m more fascinated by the equivalent geographically accurate Tube map).

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I can hear clearly now the train has gone

A young man gets on the train and I can see his ineffective white earphones from my seat.  I glance at the empty space beside me and, as I inaudibly sigh, the inevitable happens.  Yes, the music was loud but something intrigued me that I have not experienced in this situation before.  He was listening to the radio on his smartphone over his 3G connection on the train.  More precisely, he was one of the 6.7m listeners tuning in to Nick Grimshaw’s new Radio 1 breakfast show that week.  Now this is progress for digital radio and keeping younger listeners engaged with the medium. Read more on I can hear clearly now the train has gone…

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